The actor and singer played the longest running LGBTQ+ character in television history on Grey's Anatomy and soon will be seen in the next installment of the Sex and The City movies.
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Sara Ramirez
Credit: Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images for VH1 Trailblazer Honors

Sara Ramírez has been a trailblazer representing the Latinx LGBTQ+ community in film and television projects.

Their impactful role as Dr. Calliope Torres on Grey's Anatomy broke barriers as audiences saw a Mexican-American actor and singer tackling the part with all its complexities for 11 seasons. According to Out Magazine, Dr Torres is the "longest running LGBTQ+ character in TV history."

Ramírez, who was born in Mazatlán, Sinaloa, considers themselves gender non-binary; on the medical drama they played a bisexual character. In an interview with Out Magazine, they discussed the impact the role had on their own life and the LGBTQ+ community.

Sara Ramirez
Credit: Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images for VH1 Trailblazer Honors

"Prior to Callie Torres, I'd never seen myself represented on television," Ramírez said. "There was so much I didn't know that I didn't know. So, I've caught up with myself in a lot of ways."

They exited the show in 2016 and advocated for LGBTQ+ rights representing the community in projects like the long-running series Madam Secretary and in And Just Like That, where they play the first queer, non-binary stand-up comedian in the upcoming Sex and the City movie.

Sara Ramirez
Credit: Photo By Jeff Neumann/CBS via Getty Images)

"Everyone at And Just Like That… is beyond thrilled that a dynamically talented actor such as Sara Ramírez has joined the Sex and the City family," executive producer Michael Patrick King said in a press release. "Sara is a one-of-a-kind talent, equally at home with comedy and drama —and we feel excited and inspired to create this new character for the show."

The actor understands the importance of representation in these key roles.

"If we can spark fresh, new conversations in spaces that normally would not be engaging in those conversations, I think that visibility can change how we view ourselves and the world," they added.