"My mission is to make people see me as an artist and not as a woman that just makes music," she tells People CHICA. "I want to be able to compete with anyone, and I want all the attention to be focused on the art that we make and not our gender.”

By Yarely Aguilar
August 19, 2019 08:10 PM

Cazzu's career began approximately 10 years ago, but she's finally making herself known with songs like the "Loca" remix with urbano icon Bad Bunny and the "Pa Mi" remix with breakout star Sech. "I worked with Sech before he blew up," she tells People CHICA. "He was an artist who already had recognition, but he was not one of the most important artists as he is now. He is super cool. And with Bad Bunny, it was very different because he was already a big star when we were just beginning to make music."

Born Julieta Cazzucheli in Jujuy, Argentina, Cazzu discovered her love of music at a very young age, listening to Jowell y Randy, Arcangel, Daddy Yankee, RKM & Ken-Y, Avril Lavigne and Linkin Park. "I love to paint and draw, and I knew that I would end up designing something or doing music, but music took precedence so I dedicated all my time and strength toward it," she says. Initially, Cazzu was part of several rock bands and cumbia groups, but decided to pursue urban music once she realized that it was a genre she really wanted to explore. "I never imagined that reggaeton and trap would ever take on the dimension they have now," she says.

The name of her new album, Error 93, was inspired by her personality and the year she was born. "Error 93 is also like an error, like a spasm, as if something happened to your computer, like a virus in the system," she explains. "It represents my entire concept." The album includes 10 songs written by Cazzu and features collaborations with Lyanno, Rauw Alejandro, Dalex, Duki, Neo Pistea and Ysy A. Between the release of Error 93 and her first appearance at Premios Juventud last month - she was nominated for the "New in the U.S. But Big at Home" award - it's been a busy but successful year for her.

Cazzu feels very proud to be part of the urban genre and hopes to keep making a difference. "I like to sound different from the rest," she says. "Every time I find myself sounding like someone else, I come up with something different. I want to have my own style, I want to be myself, and I don't want something else to sound like me." There is no doubt that Cazzu will continue to break barriers, representing not only her Argentinian roots but all Latinas. "My mission is to make people see me as an artist and not as a woman that just makes music. I want to be able to compete with anyone, and I want all the attention to be focused on the art that we make and not our gender."

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