The Puerto Rican duo talks to People CHICA about their upcoming album, The Hunting.

By Alma Sacasa
March 05, 2020

Baby Rasta y Gringo have been working together since the '90s, but it's been almost five years since they released an album. Now, after taking some time for themselves and their personal lives, the duo are ready to release their fifth album, titled The Hunting. "What we’re currently working on is singles to heat up the motors," Baby Rasta tells People CHICA. "Baby Rasta y Gringo were pretty much out of the field because of things that happened that caused us to recreate the entire work group we had and start as independent artists."

The duo worked on the album, which is more or less done, for about three months; they're putting out songs individually now to gauge their fans' reactions. "We’re releasing single by single," explains Gringo. "As [Rasta] was saying ... we want to heat up the motors. We have had a good reaction, though. We had released 'Evidencia,' and then two weeks later had some performances [in Chile] and the Chilean audience surprised us because they were singing along."

The Hunting doesn't have a release date just yet, but they promise more singles are coming for the fans, who the duo are actually referencing in the album's title. "We’re called the wolves," Gringo explains, referencing their nickname Los Lobos. "To make our fans feel like a part of a movement, we wanted something that correlated, so the wolves are going hunting."

They only have one collaboration planned for the album, a song with Myke Towers, Noriel, and Rafa Pabón. "It’s the only feature because after such a long time of not making music — which was like three to four years — we want to give more emphasis of what is Baby Rasta y Gringo," says Rasta. "Instead of suffocating them with a bunch of features on our album."

The duo tend to focus on their own sound rather than that of other artists, but they both agree that female artists in the urbano genre are killing the game. "I try not to listen to songs by the same movement to not sound similar," says Rasta. "But I like Ivy Queen because she is one of the women who at my time and the beginning was able to shine among a lot of men and let herself be known." 

No matter what, they plan to keep working and recording, even as the industry changes around them. "We always have had that good flavor when it comes to looking for a sound we want," Gringo explains. "We continue to evolve and not stay behind."

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