The Consultant actress discusses the delectable symbolism behind her latest project and what it was like working alongside John Leguizamo.
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It goes without saying that actors love to dive into roles that are unconventional and take a good look at society's underbelly.

For actress Aimee Carrero, the film The Menu was just the kind of project that she wanted to sink her teeth into due to the poignant view it takes on society.

Carrero details, "Well, it's a dream come true to have to come across a script that is funny and dark, but also has, I think, a pretty powerful sort of message, but not in the preachy way. Just kind of like, hey, like holding up a mirror to society."

Aimee Carrero in "The Menu"
Credit: Disney

"When I first read the script, I just auditioned like everybody else. So I had no idea if I was going to get the job. But I knew that if I got the job, it would definitely, definitely be a big moment in my career as far as being able to sink your teeth into something that is really juicy and kind of just keeps giving the more you keep digging in," she continues.

The Menu is a film that follows a young couple to a remote island as they enjoy an ultra-exclusive restaurant experience—with twists and turns littered along the way.

Alongside Carrero, the ensemble cast includes the likes of Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Fiennes, John Leguizamo, Nicholas Hoult and Arturo Castro, to name a few.

Carrero's character, Felicity, is a Hollywood assistant who attends to every whim and need of Leguizamo's character (who is a famous actor).

Cast from "The Menu"
Credit: Eric Zachanowich / Searchlight Pictures

On what it was like working with Leguizamo, Carrero begins, "Well, what's cool about this relationship in the movie is that we're seated on a table together just as two."

She continues, "So during the audition process I had a chemistry read with him over Zoom, actually, and we just hit it off. And also I've been such a big fan of his for such a long time that I felt like I knew him, even though I didn't know him, I had never met him, but I had like an instant comfort with him. So, I think that really helped."

Carrero believes that after folks see the film they should walk away with a greater sense of being able to appreciate the things around them—especially if you're dining at a restaurant.

"The Menu" film poster
Credit: Searchlight Pictures

She begins, "But as far as the message, I would just say that it's a little bit more about like, 'Hey, you know, this is someone's livelihood.' You know, someone spent many, many hours, many, many days working this meal through in their head and putting a lot of time into it. And they go out and they, you know, they forage the food or they slaughter the animals for the food."

She concludes, "And if you're just sort of mindlessly consuming, you know, in a way, it's just sort of like the down the, you know, one of the downfalls of where we're currently headed, which we're not really paying attention to, to the care that it takes to make anything."

The Menu appears in theaters everywhere beginning November 18.